Book Review-Autoboyography by Christina Lauren

autoboyography

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5/5*

Published September 2017

Tanner is a bisexual teenage boy. This was not a big deal in Palo Alto, California, where he used to live. But in Mormon Provo, Utah, it is his family’s secret. He’s made it to his final semester of senior year, and is looking to the future when he can leave Utah for a more liberal and accepting environment. Then he signs up for The Seminar–a challenge to write a book in a year–and everything changes. The Seminar’s TA is Sebastian Brother, a freshman at BYU, and the most famous graduate of The Seminar whose book has been sold and is being published very soon from the start of the book.

Sebastian is everything Tanner should stay away from–handsome, straight (right?), and Mormon. But when Fujita, The Seminar’s teacher assigns Sebastian to help Tanner, something begins to bloom between them. Something deep, and forbidden.

I loved this book. The language and descriptions are so beautiful that they just transport you to the world of the book.

As he faces the class from the front now, his eyes flash when they meet mine–for a tine flicker of a second, and then again, like a prism catching light, because he does a double take. That fraction of a heartbeat is long enough for him to register my immediate infatuation. Holy shit, how quickly he recognizes it. This must happen to him all the time–an adoring gaze from across the room–but to me, being so instantly infatuated is entirely foreign. Inside my chest, my lungs are wild animals, clawing at the cage.

Tanner is a very likeable character. Your hearts bleeds with him, and breaks for him, and rejoices with his because you become so emotionally invested in the book. He is still three dimensional with faults and blindspots, though. Sebastian is an equally engaging and complex character–to the point where I would buy the same book written from his point of view and I always scorn those as cheap cash grabs (coughGREYcough). He is the Bishop’s son, expected to leave for his mission right after his book tour, with the expectation that he’ll return in two years to finish up at BYU and get married to a woman and start having kids.

That Tanner’s mom is a former Mormon only adds depth to the story. She left after her parents kicked her sister out of the house for being gay. So when her son falls for a Mormon boy, her own wounds re-open and she is scared for him.

The author clearly researched Mormonism. I used to be close with a Mormon family, and even investigated joining the church and this feels very honest.

I feel like this is one of a growing trend of YA books that is creating queer love stories in a mainstream environment. Romance publishing isn’t that progressive unless you go to the smaller houses. Adult fiction in general doesn’t have a lot of queer representation. So congrats to YA for moving that ball forward. And this isn’t just a YA book–I think the adult market would emotionally engage with the book. (The person who recommended the book as well as I are both around 40, for example.)

I honestly struggle to find a fault or area of improvement for this book, so it’s getting a rare 5* review from me.

 

 

 

No new post today

Hi all

My chronic pain condition has been a problem yesterday and today. If I can I’ll post tomorrow to make up for missing today, otherwise we’ll be back Wednesday.

Kid Vid Review—Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jim Benton

Buy Dear Dumb Diary #1: Let’s Pretend This Never Happened

4.5*/5*

Published August 2013

 

I interviewed my older daughter about a book she recently read and really liked. Here are her thoughts… (she’s quiet so you will want to turn up your volume)

 

Review–When Trump Changed: The Feminist Science Fiction League Quashes the Orange Outrage Pussy Grabber by Marleen S. Barr

Buy When Trump Changed Here

2/5*

Published July 2018

 

This satirical anthology of short stories by Marleen S. Barr attacks Donald Trump’s presidency with any number of variations familiar to science fiction fans.

The stories are short. This makes for a bathroom book where you can read a few stories and put it back down. However, if you read too many at a time, fatigue sets in and the stories blur together.

My favorite story is “Springtime for Trump,” a hilarious take on the already hilarious movie/musical The Producers. Instead of creating the most offensive play ever created, two feminist extraterrestrials decide to create the most offensive male candidate in history and pit him against the most qualified woman in history. Just as in The Producers, the joke is on the aliens when the public embraces Donald Trump.

I am disappointed, however, by the fact that while this purports to be a feminist book there are hostile comments about weight (planet wide obesity problem emerged…subway riders had to eat right and excercise…Weight Watchers membership skyrocketed, his already fat ass instantaneously became huge), and outright attacks on Melania’s history as a model (she had no skills other than posing nude, my brother says you’re nothing but a ho, she continued to speak in a prostitute-like tone). There’s a story when a black girl speaks stereotypical AAVE–ho, skanky-ass. I don’t want to stay here with no trump pigs–and it’s painfully obvious that it was written by someone white. I could go into a long song and dance, but feminism isn’t worth a damn when it’s not intersectional and this isn’t intersectional feminism, it’s a specific type of white feminism and that’s disappointing and caused my rating to drop from a four to a two.

Ultimately, I think the anthology would’ve been stronger both as parody and an anthology had it been multi-authored, or a single narrative with the fictional Dr. Sondra Lear as the heroine. However, it’s much more highly reviewed on Amazon/Goodreads–Your mileage may vary.

Want my copy of the book? Leave a comment and I’ll contact the winner. Contest closes Sept 15, 2018.

Review–Must Love Black by Kelly McClymer

Click here to buy Must Love Black

Rating 4/5*

Published January 2011

Philippa’s father just remarried, years after her mother died in a tragic car wreck. So she’s relieved to have a summer job to escape to. She’s to nanny ten year old twin girls at a mansion (turned spa) on the cliffs of Bar Harbor, Maine. The ad specified must love black, but that’s no problem for Philippa, who lives in black.

The mansion (spa) is not quite what it seems. Philippa is confined to the “domain” of the twins, with a rigorous schedule that includes mandatory “fun” time. However, fun must never bring them into contact with the guests. They almost never see the twins’ father, and when they do, it’s almost never without his business partner, Lady Buena Verde who seems intent on keeping the dad away from his daughter. More, did Philippa really see a ghost? Are the mysterious goings on a ghost or just Philippa’s overactive imagination, spurred on by the gothic novel her mother wrote?

McClymer uses snippets from Manor of Dark Dreams, the book by Philippa’s mother at the start of each chapter to help set the tone and act as meta commentary. It’s a device used to good advantage, and the snippets are tantalizing enough to want to read it (or you can read Jane Eyre, which Manor of Dark Dreams is clearly modeled after).

The characters are mostly well done. The twins are generally treated as a singular unit until the introduction of the pet goat, Misty Gale. I wish we could’ve seen more differentiation between the two. Mr. Pertweath evolves over the course of the book. Philippa’s character arc is more about bringing the girls and their father together than making her more interested in or sympathetic toward her father or interested in giving her stepmother a chance–but I think that’s pretty true to form for a sixteen year old.

The supernatural elements of the book are much more subtle than I had expected, given the flap copy, but are present. But if you are looking for a full blown ghost story, this isn’t it–the supernatural is more of a secondary or tertiary storyline.

It’s a fun, easy read for YA readers.

ARC review: Night and Silence by Seanan McGuire

I received this arc (advance reader’s copy) from Seanan at the convention I was at over the weekend. It was a gift, but I think it’s only fair that I review it. In the future I plan to give away the physical ARCs, but this one was given to me by Seanan and it’s autographed to me, so it needs to stay with me.

Warning–this is the 12th book in the October Daye series. There are some spoilers for the previous 11 books/the world after the image of the cover. My recommendation to read the series is in my seven favorite books posts here (on Delilah Night’s website).

Click here to buy Night and Silence

Rating: 4.5/5

Publication date: September 2018

 

After the events of book 11, The Brightest Fell, things aren’t going great. Tybalt and Jazz have PTSD–Tybalt isn’t even coming to see Toby. Are they even together anymore? No one is coping well. Then Gillian’s father shows up at Toby’s house and tells her Gilly has been kidnapped–again–nearly accusing her of it. She has to go and find her daughter, and it’s clear that someone/s Fae were involved.

When I first read the flap copy for Night and Silence, I was concerned. We’d already done a Gillian was kidnapped plotline in One Salt Sea (book 5). However, Seanan McGuire is brilliant and manages to turn what could so easily have been a recycled plot point into an exciting new story that draws us further into Faerie–not just today but the history and mythology of the world. I would never spoil a plot point, but I will say there are a number of twists and turns, one actually eliciting an audible gasp.

In terms of character development, the way Tybalt’s PTSD plays out is respectful to those who suffer from it. He doesn’t just “get over it.” He is struggling to be who he was, and failing miserably. We don’t see Jazz in this book–she’s referenced but is physically absent–but we know she can’t sleep. Both of them are haunted by Amandine’s actions. Toby isn’t doing so well either–she’s plagued by doubt and recrimination and Gilly’s abduction hits her like a ton of bricks, and she has to pull her shit together, at least on the surface, until she can get Gilly back.

The pacing is tight, and as always McGuire’s characters all have distinct voices and personalities. The tenor is slightly different from the books because Toby is so stretched so thin, emotionally, at this point in time. The way McGuire shifts Toby’s voice leaves it authentic–achingly so because you get drawn into the mire of her grief, terror and fragility. This is not to say there is no humor or that it’s a depressing book–it’s neither of those–merely that the stakes are raised on any number of fronts. There’s still the characteristic McGuire touch of snarky humor–too many character’s voices would be inauthentic if that were missing.

I highly recommend this book. 4.5/5 stars from me.

In the print copy (I’m not sure about digital, sorry) there is also a novella told from Gillian’s point of view that you won’t want to miss. If it’s not in the e-book, you’re going to want to go and buy the physical book so you can read it.