Review–Kissing Frogs by Tori Turnbull

Buy here on Kindle for 2.99

5/5*

Published June 2018

 

I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review

Twenty-nine year old Kate is “riding the euphoric wave of successful shoe shopping” when she is exiting the Tube. Until the escalator reaches the top, and Kate is faced with an incredibly unflattering picture of Kate captioned “Date my daughter.” Yes, her mother has used her pension to pay for the humiliating digital posters. Worse, after Kate is arrested for trying to damage the posters, she is picked up by her childhood nemesis Mark who eggs her mother on. Kate agrees to date for two months to get her mother off her back. Even more worse, it turns out Mark is going to be sharing her flat in exchange for doing home improvements for her mother, who owns the building.

Things go about as well as expected. There’s the stalker. The one who flees. The one on the cover who won’t let go of her legs even as she’s beating him with carnations.

I couldn’t put the book down. Between the hilariously bad dates and the growing sexual tension between Kate and Mark it was irresistible. It’s obvious to the reader that they belong together and that Mark is trying to pursue her. The end result is a sleek, funny romance.

Written in the first person voice, Kate comes through loud and clear. At first I thought it was a bit of a riff on the whole Bridget Jones thing, especially with an antagonist she’s known since childhood named Mark, but Bridget and Kate are very distinct and different voices, although fans of Bridget Jones should check this book out..

Even though you don’t get Mark’s inner voice, he’s well written. His personality comes across clearly, as does his interest in Kate. The secondary characters are developed enough. If there was more side story for them, I think it would take away from Kate and Mark’s story and make it flabby.

There are only a few sex scenes, but they’re worth the wait. Turnbull builds the tension so well that the reader is plenty turned on and ready to go by the time Kate and Mark are. From the moment Kate sees Mark coming out of the shower in just a towel, the chemistry sparks. When Mark begins to date someone, Turnbull ensures that we’re just as irritated by it as Kate, although she’s blind as to why she’s so jealous.

Turnbull has another book, and the highest compliment I can give her is that I’ve already bought her other book.

 

 

 

On Vacation

I had hoped to write enough blog posts ahead of time that I wouldn’t have to take a break while on vacation, but ultimately that hope was futile. I’ll be back on 10/17.

Review–Mating the Huntress by Talia Hibbert

Get it here on kindle for $0.99.

5/5*

Pub October 2018

 

This hot Halloween erotic romance can be devoured in one bite (pun intended).

Chastity identifies the hot stranger who keeps coming into her family’s coffee shop as a werewolf right away. But she doesn’t warn her family of huntresses, or even any of the men in her family. When he finally asks her out, she says yes. If she can kill him, she’ll prove to her family that she can be a huntress, too. The problem is that he’s not a mindless beast, like she’d been warned. He seems like a….a guy. An artist, even. Can a monster make art? Worse, can a monster inspire feelings other than hate….like lust?

Luke is a werewolf. But like most weres, he’s a solitary creature who likes his meat raw–and the forest behind his house keeps him perfectly happy via plenty of rabbits and such. But on a full moon, he’s chased by a group of huntresses…only to catch the scent of something primal. His mate. But the woman wearing the sweatshirt isn’t her. Instead she’s this shy, sweet girl who works in a coffee shop. Or so he thinks…until she tries to kill him.

Luke and Chas have chemistry that sparks right off the page. They’re easy to root for because it’s blindingly obvious that they should be together. Their banter is hot, and their fighting even more so. When they finally get together, I was squirming.

I love the idea of huntresses being obsessed with killing mindless monsters versus the very civilized but solitary werewolf who just wants to meet and commit to his mate for life. The dichotomy makes their story sparkle.

Luke is very much an alpha character. He doesn’t hesitate to take control or make a move. But he’s also committed to consent, which is really sexy. There’s an instance where the consent is blurry and he pulls away immediately. This only makes him hotter.

I wish it were longer, but I always wish a Talia Hibbert book were longer–she’s such a talented writer that I am always sorry when the story finishes. There’s such a great glimpse into the world of the huntresses and the world of werewolves. She has a unique take on what can be a really tiresome trope. Kudos, Talia!

It’s October 1, which means it’s on sale TODAY!

Review: Dream Eater by K. Bird Lincoln

Buy Dream Eater here

3*/5

Publication date–April 2017

 

I bought Dream Eater at the Worldcon Convention from the publisher’s table.

The idea is a interesting one. There are beings, called Kind, from every culture with powers and skills unique to them, more than what any mortal would have. Koi is a half Japanese, half Hawaiian college aged woman. She has a phobia about touching people because when she does, she gets a snippet of what they dream. Her mom has died, her father has dementia and her little sister is the one who holds the family together. But at the start of the book, her sister Marlin needs Koi to step up and watch her father. Koi needs to go to class, and ends up leaning on a man named Ken to watch her father. But Ken isn’t all that he seems to be–he’s a Kitsune, sent to bring her father back to Japan to face the Council. There’s a professor with evil intentions who is after Koi, as well. At first he claims it’s just for translating, but it turns out he needs her to help free the water dragon trapped in a stone, and he’s willing to hurt whoever gets in his way. The book fuses mythology from around the world, predominantly Japanese and Pacific Northwest First Peoples.

The book was pretty uneven. At times I was so engaged I devoured a chunk of it. At others, I was bored, or just lost track of the blend of mythologies.

The thing that grabbed me most was the budding sexual tension between Koi and Ken. I wanted to know where it went more than I cared about the battle between the water dragon and Thunderbird. If I read the sequel, Black Pearl Dreaming, it’s because I want to know how Ken and Koi are doing as a couple.

I got lost a number of times because the blended mythology got confusing, or didn’t work as I tried to fit the puzzle pieces of the story together. But I think this would be a selling point to other readers. I don’t think it’s necessarily badly done as much as it was I am busy and just lost the thread, and once lost, it’s impossible to get back without going back and starting over.

So ultimately, I give it a 3/3.5* out of 5 because it was okay–I didn’t dislike it. But I doubt that I’ll read the sequel.

Problematic Harry Potter

A friend and I were recently talking about Harry Potter. She, like me, is reading book one to her almost seven year old. I’m also reading book five with my almost ten year old.

Harry Potter is twenty years old. And in some ways, it’s showing its age.

There is a ton of fatphobia that might or might not be okay today. I say might or might not as fat phobia is alive and well today. What do I mean by fat phobia? Many of the villainous people in the books are described as fat as shorthand for lazy, greedy, mean, and evil. The Dursleys, Aunt Petunia, and Delores Umbridge are some of the characters described this way.

The racial representation is…not good. You have the Patels, Lee Jordan, Cho Chang, and a few other background characters are people of color. Ron, Harry, and Hermione are all white, canonically. Yes, a black actress played Hermione in Cursed Child, but that’s colorblind casting, not a sudden reversal of cannon. The movies are even worse, as you can see below. Just over six minutes of speaking time for people of color in eight movies.

Hermione is a white savior. She never asks or listens to the House Elves. She just decides she knows what’s best, and starts S.P.E.W., or the Society for the Prevention of Elvish Welfare. In book five, she even leaves hats and socks around the Gryffindor common room so that an elf might pick it up and be freed. The Hogwarts House Elves are, in fact, so angry about this that they refuse to clean the common room, and the only reason that it gets cleaned is because Dobby does it out of love for Harry Potter. Yes, there is abuse–Dobby and Kreacher are both victims of abuse. But it’s problematic when someone decides that they know what’s best for a class of people without consulting them–sort of what men are doing to women’s reproductive health.

Hermione does so much emotional labor for Harry and Ron. For the love of god, boys, do your own fucking homework for a change, for one. Y’all would be dead without Hermione.

There is still a LOT of good in the HP books, and I identify as a Ravenclaw. But it’s inappropriate to give something a pass just because you like it.

Broken laptops make writing hard

Last night my laptop refused to plug in. It’s currently at a shop, and I have every finger and toe crossed that it will be an easy fix. ATM I’m borrowing my daughter’s laptop, but it’s a kid laptop and doesn’t have word or any of the things I’m used to. It also doesn’t have an obvious way for me to get pictures to use in my posts, which is a problem when reviewing books.

For today, this is my post. Depending on what the repair shop says, I’ll either have an eta on getting my laptop repaired or I’ll know that I’m buying a new one.