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Kid Book Review: The Monster at the End of this Book reviewed by Rhiannon

Screen Shot 2014-05-07 at 11.50.51 AM

They say that kids and pets are the two most frustrating creatures to work with.  I think we’re giving pets a bad rap.  This is the closest I could get to an interview with either of my kids this past week.

Rhi is “reviewing” one of her favorite books.  According to my mom, I was a huge fan of it as a little child as well.  As a parent, I find it a tough read–it only works if you can get yourself into hyper dramatic read aloud place.  There are days I’m just too tired.

The plot–Grover is scared of the monster, and begs you/tries to stop you from turning the page.  But of course you do.  And Grover discovers that the only monster there is him!  It’s….okay.  It’s a damn sight better than the retread they did in the last decade called the “OTHER” monster at the end of the book, starring Elmo (one of the least necessary books ever published).  At least neither of them rhymes.

If your kid likes Sesame Street and you’re good with voices, it can be a winner.  If they’re not, or you’re not–give it a pass.

Book Review: The Three Little Pigs by Susanna Davidson (Georgien Overwater, illustrator)

Screen Shot 2014-04-11 at 7.59.36 PMThe Three Little Pigs by Susanna Davidson, Georgien Overwater (illustrator)

Rating: 3/5 from Elanor

Here is Elanor’s second book review.  Please remember that she is only five, and that she’s new to summarizing and presenting material.

In the end, the only real differences betwixt versions of The Three Little Pigs is how it ends.  For parents who are worried about “scary ending” you should know that this is one of the versions where the wolf climbs on top of the brick house and then comes down the chimney.  The Pigs have boiling water ready to go and have some Wolf Soup.  Or, as we say in my household–bad choice, bad consequence.

We got our copy of the book as part of a 50 book set from Usborne–all soft cover copies of stories from The Three Little Pigs to The Wizard of Oz.  I don’t know that I would make much of an effort to find a specific edition of The Three Little Pigs as a parent, but this is a reasonably good version.

Book Review: Silly Sally by Audrey Wood

silly sallySilly Sally by Audrey Wood

Rating: 4/5 Stars (me)  5/5 (Rhiannon)

On Friday I posted Elanor’s first book review.  Her younger sister, Rhiannon (age 2) saw me videotaping Elanor, and insisted that she do a video review of a book, too.  She worships her older sister, and anything that Ellie does must also be done by Rhi.  So I humored her and was pleasantly surprised by what Rhi did on camera with her book.  Obviously it’s not a review, but I think it demonstrates her love of the book.  Ellie and I were first introduced to Silly Sally in a parent/child class in 2009 and added it to our library.  The book has been a hit with both children.  I didn’t give it a rating from Ellie as I don’t really remember what she thought of it.  I do recall reading Silly Sally with some amount of frequency with Elanor–but not the near nightly reading that Rhi insists on.

Silly Sally is a really fun book told in a rhyming scheme (Silly Sally went to town/walking backwards upside down and so forth).  On the way to town she meets a pig (who dances a jig) a dog (who plays leapfrog) and so forth.  But she falls asleep!  How will she get to town now?

Unlike The Little Rabbit Who Liked to Say MOO (see link above), there isn’t a grand moral or lesson here.  It’s a silly book that my littles have loved.  It’s great fun to act out.  As you can see in Rhi’s video we often dance a jig (or at least wiggle dance while seated), have a stuffed animal leap frog over the book, and so forth with each animal.  When there is tickling we tickle.

I picked up a Silly Sally felt story telling set at a teacher store a few years ago.  Within a month we’d lost several of the pieces, so it has been retired.  Far more practical if you have a little who loves Silly Sally are the coloring pages offered as free downloads on the official Audrey Wood website.

Silly Sally is on my list of (board) books I would typically purchase for a second birthday present.  Although E and R both enjoyed it before age 2, it was around age 2 that they really began to interact with it.  Elanor (5) doesn’t pick Silly Sally as a read aloud anymore, but she’ll happily sit and listen if I’m reading it with Rhiannon.  I think it’s best for those littles between 1 or 2 and 4.

Book Review: The Little Rabbit Who Liked to Say MOO by Jonathan Allen

Screen Shot 2014-03-20 at 11.18.09 PMThe Little Rabbit Who Liked to Say MOO by Jonathan Allen

Rating 3/5 stars (me) 4/5 stars (Ellie)

Elanor has been watching a lot of Reading Rainbow lately.  This is a children’s tv program that showed in the US from 1983 through 2006 resulting in 155 episodes.  At the end of each episode, three children review books that they’ve read.  Elanor has been fascinated by these segments, and when I suggested she review a book for me, she was eager.  I will warn you in advance that this is Elanor’s first attempt at reviewing a book and her summarization and presentation skills are in line with a five year old who has never done this before.

I like The Little Rabbit Who Liked to Say Moo.  It’s a cute story that shows kids it’s okay to step outside the boundaries of what they’re supposed to do and to try new things.  Calf is surprised that Little Rabbit likes to say “moo.”  But when Little Rabbit asks him if he likes any other noises, the calf says that they like “baa.”  This brings over the lamb, and so forth.  At the end of the story, each of the baby animals reflects that they have fun saying the other sounds, but that they like their own noise best.  Except Little Rabbit–who reveals his very favorite sound on the last page.

I’d put this as a book that’s best for age 2 through maybe 6.  It’s a simple repetitive story that the younger kids can follow.  Kids like making the sounds along with you, which is what makes it a fun read aloud.  The illustrations are cute. There are no rhymes, which can make it (and the other Allen books) a nice break when your brain is about to fry from rhyming overload.  Personally, I would’ve picked up Little Rabbit because we like Jonathan Allen’s books in general and “I’m Not Sleepy” in particular.  Given my choices, I would’ve read it aloud a few times and then moved onto a book that I enjoy reading aloud more (or rereading) like Mo Willems–Mo Willems is always good for a dramatic reading.  But in our house the kids pick the books (or at least pick 2 of the 3 read alouds per night) so I read what I’m asked to read.

Unlike a “Llama Llama Red Pajama”–which I consider an essential addition to a home library–Little Rabbit only needs to visit your home from the library.