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Kid Vid Review–The Book with No Pictures by B.J. Novak

The Book With No Pictures by B.J. Novak

4/5*

Published Sept 2014

This week it’s Rhi’s turn and she picked one of her favorite books to have read to her–The Book with No Pictures. As a heads up, if you can’t read with expression and make silly noises, this is not for you. It can also get a little tiresome if you have read it every day for an extended period of time. BUT if you are comfortable being silly, your kids will LOVE this book. Rhi might give it a 5*, but I’d say it’s a 4*–enjoyable, worth rereading, definitely a book for the home library, but not something you might look forward to reading with them, especially after the first 100 or so times.

The Book with No Pictures is best for the pre-K to grade 2 set, but my fifth grader almost always shows up if we are reading it, and she laughs her head off, too, although I don’t think she’s ever bothered to read it on her own. It’s the experience of a parent/adult being silly that makes them both lose their minds.

And Tango makes a banned book

I’m crossposting this from my expat blog because the subject of book banning is worth addressing more than once.

Expat Bostonians

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Dear parents who challenge this book

I too, am a parent.  I too have had my children bring over books that I am not comfortable with them reading at their current ages.  The difference between you and I is that I tell my children to put the book back because it’s not right for our family,  while you choose to tell ALL children that they may not read the book.  Your family’s “just right” books don’t trump mine.

You argue that it is oppositional to your faith.  I would counter that all religious texts are oppositional to mine.  Yet I am not asking the library to remove children’s Bibles because they have no place in my faith.  Your faith does not trump mine.

You say that this book promotes a “homosexual agenda.”

  • Firstly I am curious what you think a homosexual agenda is.  I’ll let you in on a non-secret–I’m…

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Kid Book Review: The Monster at the End of this Book reviewed by Rhiannon

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They say that kids and pets are the two most frustrating creatures to work with.  I think we’re giving pets a bad rap.  This is the closest I could get to an interview with either of my kids this past week.

Rhi is “reviewing” one of her favorite books.  According to my mom, I was a huge fan of it as a little child as well.  As a parent, I find it a tough read–it only works if you can get yourself into hyper dramatic read aloud place.  There are days I’m just too tired.

The plot–Grover is scared of the monster, and begs you/tries to stop you from turning the page.  But of course you do.  And Grover discovers that the only monster there is him!  It’s….okay.  It’s a damn sight better than the retread they did in the last decade called the “OTHER” monster at the end of the book, starring Elmo (one of the least necessary books ever published).  At least neither of them rhymes.

If your kid likes Sesame Street and you’re good with voices, it can be a winner.  If they’re not, or you’re not–give it a pass.

This week in the world of reading

Every so often, I’m going to want to highlight various news articles I find about various literacy related interests from who’s banning what book to where I bought a cute book-themed t-shirt for the girls.

Things making me very happy this week

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(US) Harper Lee has given her approval to e-publish “To Kill a Mockingbird,” which is one of my all time favorite books.  Expected publication is July 2014.  Read more here.

(International) The extended trailer for “The Fault in Our Stars” is out.  The movie is being released, and in the face of all the disappointing movie adaptations that have come before it, I am STILL very excited to see this.

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(USA) Free comic book day is May 3d!  Don’t forget to take your kids to the comic book store and help them get hooked.  Dear parents who get their underwear in a twist over comic books–your kid is reading.  Full stop.  Read more here.

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(FRANCE) Mo Willems is writing in Paris.  Or at least sketching the passersby of the cafe in which he’s writing.  He is one of the household’s favorite author.  If not for the article–watch the video (or BOTH).  He wants you to know that being a child sucks.  Here

 

Things infuriating me this week

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(USA) Parents successfully banned “The absolutely true diary of a part time Indian” (one of the most banned books in the US currently–and on my reading list) in a school district in Idaho for, among other things “unChristian content.”  Students at the school organized a petition fighting the ban.  People in Washington raised money and donated 350 copies of the book to a local bookstore to hand out to teens who wanted to read it.  A parent called the cops to arrest (?) the people handing out the free books.  Read more about it here.

 

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(CANADA) Someone (a “patron” or “a father’s rights group” depending on your source) attempted to have Hop on Pop banned in Toronto libraries because it advocates violence against fathers.  It was unsuccessful.  Read more here

 

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(UK) There are both international and local efforts forming to ask the British government to reconsider its ban on sending prisoners books.  Read more here and here.

 

Screen Shot 2014-04-30 at 9.47.53 PM(CHINA) China has started arresting male/male slash fanfic writers.  Most of them are young women. (slash–homosexual pairings in fan fiction like Kirk & Spock)  Read more here.

Book Review: The Three Little Pigs by Susanna Davidson (Georgien Overwater, illustrator)

Screen Shot 2014-04-11 at 7.59.36 PMThe Three Little Pigs by Susanna Davidson, Georgien Overwater (illustrator)

Rating: 3/5 from Elanor

Here is Elanor’s second book review.  Please remember that she is only five, and that she’s new to summarizing and presenting material.

In the end, the only real differences betwixt versions of The Three Little Pigs is how it ends.  For parents who are worried about “scary ending” you should know that this is one of the versions where the wolf climbs on top of the brick house and then comes down the chimney.  The Pigs have boiling water ready to go and have some Wolf Soup.  Or, as we say in my household–bad choice, bad consequence.

We got our copy of the book as part of a 50 book set from Usborne–all soft cover copies of stories from The Three Little Pigs to The Wizard of Oz.  I don’t know that I would make much of an effort to find a specific edition of The Three Little Pigs as a parent, but this is a reasonably good version.

Book Review: Silly Sally by Audrey Wood

silly sallySilly Sally by Audrey Wood

Rating: 4/5 Stars (me)  5/5 (Rhiannon)

On Friday I posted Elanor’s first book review.  Her younger sister, Rhiannon (age 2) saw me videotaping Elanor, and insisted that she do a video review of a book, too.  She worships her older sister, and anything that Ellie does must also be done by Rhi.  So I humored her and was pleasantly surprised by what Rhi did on camera with her book.  Obviously it’s not a review, but I think it demonstrates her love of the book.  Ellie and I were first introduced to Silly Sally in a parent/child class in 2009 and added it to our library.  The book has been a hit with both children.  I didn’t give it a rating from Ellie as I don’t really remember what she thought of it.  I do recall reading Silly Sally with some amount of frequency with Elanor–but not the near nightly reading that Rhi insists on.

Silly Sally is a really fun book told in a rhyming scheme (Silly Sally went to town/walking backwards upside down and so forth).  On the way to town she meets a pig (who dances a jig) a dog (who plays leapfrog) and so forth.  But she falls asleep!  How will she get to town now?

Unlike The Little Rabbit Who Liked to Say MOO (see link above), there isn’t a grand moral or lesson here.  It’s a silly book that my littles have loved.  It’s great fun to act out.  As you can see in Rhi’s video we often dance a jig (or at least wiggle dance while seated), have a stuffed animal leap frog over the book, and so forth with each animal.  When there is tickling we tickle.

I picked up a Silly Sally felt story telling set at a teacher store a few years ago.  Within a month we’d lost several of the pieces, so it has been retired.  Far more practical if you have a little who loves Silly Sally are the coloring pages offered as free downloads on the official Audrey Wood website.

Silly Sally is on my list of (board) books I would typically purchase for a second birthday present.  Although E and R both enjoyed it before age 2, it was around age 2 that they really began to interact with it.  Elanor (5) doesn’t pick Silly Sally as a read aloud anymore, but she’ll happily sit and listen if I’m reading it with Rhiannon.  I think it’s best for those littles between 1 or 2 and 4.